traditional music

Purcell Partials Pietist – first album sponsored by FPA

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Nathan Bissette, an English/American musician and composer, and Kristin Borgehed, Swedish dito, as well as co-founder of FPA, launched their album PurcellPartialsPietist in November 2016.

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Performing at the Grassmarket in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The duo was founded a few years ago, in Aberdeen, Scotland. The work is based in traditional singing and playing from central parts of Sweden/northeast Scotland, and  consists mainly of improvisation and microtonality. String instruments and voices are the main instruments we work with.

This work has a practical side, as is shown on this CD, as well as a theoretical, through Kristin’s PhD studies on microtonality in singing. The repertoire includes a variety of tings, from dance music to church music, from lullabies to wordless humming.

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Nathan playing the theorbo.

 

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Participating in the international research conference “Beyond the semitone”.

The album has been very well received, and we look forward to travel around with this music in 2017. Kristin and Nathan would like to say thanks to the board of FPA for this kind contribution!

Here are links to the album, and also to our facebookpage, where all news about concerts etc appear!

[https://www.facebook.com/Jonzonband/?fref=ts]

 

 

 

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#koraleriet sings Den Signade Dag

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Last Sunday we, five of nine singers from #koraleriet, sang chorales at the medieval inspired service in Heliga Kors church in Ronneby.

One of the chorales sung was the all-time-high-hit Den Signade Dag, which oldest found transmission in writing is dated to 1450.This chorale has been sung continuously for hundreds of years and ties together catholicism and protestantism.

Our version of melody was noted down by Nils Stålberg, and sung to him by Ingrid Isaksson, who lived in a small cottage in the village Röaby, some km north of Bräkne-Hoby in Blekinge.

The musical arrangements are made by Kristin Borgehed,after detailed analyses of how melody interacts with pronunciation patterns in that very local dialect.

Singers: Kristin Borgehed, Astrid Selling, Lisa Stormlod, Emma Feldmanis, Linnea Gustafsson

Singing and playing instruments as a form of technology

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With a few days’ distance to sonADA 2015 | Theme: MESS (http://sonada.org/sonADA2015/), I have the opportunity to sit down and share som of my thoughts.

The festival invitation said “If music is organized sound, composing really starts by identifying chaotic elements. sonADA invites and challenges artists to showcase mess of their own.”, and I made two contributions. On the opening night of the festival, at the 17 Art Gallery in Aberdeen, Scotland, (https://www.list.co.uk/place/52799-seventeen/) I took part in a panel discussion as one out of three female composers/performers. With lively input from the audience, we talked about our backgrounds, but also if and how embodiment, and the aspect of gender/femininity, has impact on our creative and scientific work. My own contribution did, as always, start with some live singing. A little microtonality, and asymmetrical beats here and there sure wake up most audiences! It is a fine and thought provoking experience that when travelling abroad with the music that is closest and most intuitive to you, like a “nonsense song” or a lullaby you learned as a small child, musicians with decades of formal music education could make comments like “that must be difficult!” Yes, it is, and no, it’s not!

My talk was mainly on how singing and playing instruments are not only something you do in your spare time, but how the performative act of making live acoustic music is actually a form of technology in itself. Lots of discussions circled around what could be said to be a musical piece, regarding tradition. A very good question – please fell free to make comments here! (in any language, as always!)

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The second contribution was giving a performance together with my English Aberdeen colleague Nathan Bissette (http://www.serg-aberdeen.net). We have worked together for years, around performing and composing traditional, as well as classical and electronic music. We were invited as two separate composers, but chose to collaborate on a longer piece, made for this special occasion. It was a nice crowd, and we were prepared with our two chairs, the floor, a scarf, a computer, a guitar and two voices. The reception was very good, and people were singing along – as we encouraged them to, despite that this was not the typical folk audience that are used to that.

I left the festival with many good impressions, and an increased courage and interest in continuing to work for highlighting the multi-dimensional skills it takes being a traditional musician!

Tack för er stund!!

Kristin, PhD student at Elphinstone Institute (https://www.abdn.ac.uk/elphinstone/)

(http://www.abdn.ac.uk/staffnet/profiles/r01keb12)

Linnea Blomgren – reflection about overtones

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Read Linnea Blomgren’s  reflection about overtones

linneab23 Linnea Blomgren is 18 years old, and an active member of our project Baltic Sea Inter Cult project, where youth in Sweden, Estonia and Poland learn about networking, culture & identity development, project management, etc through traditional music.